Tuesday, August 12, 2008

TYHIVN Road Trip: The Alpine Slide tour

"Everybody likes a little thrill every now and then, and the Alpine Slide is ready to oblige."
- Lutsen Mountains website

As loyal TYHIVN readers know, lately this internet journal has entertained an unhealthy fixation on varietals of concrete slides, specifically in San Francisco. Careening down slippery concrete on a tattered cardboard toboggan is indeed a pleasure peculiar to the city by the bay. Recent discoveries by close associate Mr. Jon Anderson, however, reveal that our treasured urban concrete slides have some very large rural relatives. Having evolved unconstrained by zoning laws or limited land space, these gigantic, corn-fed concrete cousins snake through dense forests and sweep across grassy hillsides. Alpine Slides, as they are called, offer smooth, prolonged exhilaration as well as unprecedented control. Below is a selection of the world's finest Alpine Slides. Please note: must be 48" tall to ride.

Park City Mountain Resort, Park City, UT
Single ride: $11
The leaves are changing turning red, yellow, and orange, but your face is turning green from the extreme curves! Four tracks to choose from and over 3,000 feet of sliding.


Attitash, Bartlett, NH
Single ride: $15
Enough people say, you know they can't believe, New Hampshire, we have a bobsled team.



Pico Mountain, Killington, VT
Single ride: $10
Don't look down: these twin slides drop 650 vertical feet.





Snow King Resort, Jackson Hole, WY
Single ride: $12 ($15 peak season June 21-Aug 17)
This attraction winds through 2,500 feet of woods and wildflowers.

Alpine Slide at Magic Mountain, Big Bear Lake, CA
Single Ride: $4
Touted as "Southern California's only authentic bobsled experience," this alpine slide offers views of a lake and mountains (both not pictured).


Great Wall of China!? Learn more here.







The Faces of Alpine Sliding, a collage:


2 comments:

abigllama said...

How could you skip Bromely? The very first Alpine Slide in North America. They have a fast track designed so you can lay into it without any of those pesky smaller curves that cause the fishtailing. Also the older slides are actually made of a combo of fiberglass and asbestos! Looks and feels like concrete but isn't. The newer slides like at Park City are made of a softer plastic material that's easier if you wipe out, but not so good for speed!

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